The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition

Front Cover
Basic Books, Nov 5, 2013 - Design - 384 pages
Design doesn't have to complicated, which is why this guide to human-centered design shows that usability is just as important as aesthetics.
Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door.
The fault, argues this ingenious -- even liberating -- book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization.
The Design of Everyday Things shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time.

The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how -- and why -- some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - untraveller - LibraryThing

I enjoyed much of the book. Problems were: it reads like a textbook, more examples are needed, it is definitely pro business and pro engineering - two activities I am not fond of, and the author is ... Read full review

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User Review  - mrgan - LibraryThing

DoeT isn't the world's best written book—Norman's style is too often kvetchy-casual, sounding more like a modern-day ranty blog post than a classic of academic design writing. But that is only one ... Read full review

Contents

2
37
4
123
5
162
7
258
Acknowledgments
299
General Readings and Notes
305
References
321
Index
331
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About the author (2013)

Don Norman is a co-founder of the Nielsen Norman Group, and holds graduate degrees in both engineering and psychology. His many books include Emotional Design, The Design of Future Things, and Living with Complexity. He lives in Silicon Valley, California.

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